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How the World Seems to See the 2016 US Election by Will-Erwin How the World Seems to See the 2016 US Election by Will-Erwin
I don't generally play much with politics or satire, but as I was playing around with the election map last night and reflecting on the massive shock to markets world-wide, this idea popped into my head.

I guess that DeviantArt coloring challenge a few months ago planted the seed of this particular idea. I created this using the CNN Interactive Presidential Election Map, with a little manipulation in GIMP.
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:iconpictureonprogress:
PictureOnProgress Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
First thing I see is "FU"
Heh, I see what you did there :giggle:
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep! I just wish this piece wasn't still so applicable.
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:iconpictureonprogress:
PictureOnProgress Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I think it will always be applicable.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I hope you're wrong, but I fear you're right.
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:iconpictureonprogress:
PictureOnProgress Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
You could use it in so many contexts...
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:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2016  Professional Writer
:D Nice...

Riots & protests against Trump’s election are happening all over the U.S. now. Tens-of-thousands are marching past my apt building as I write this. Largely young, poor & elderly people who realize their future is now screwed...

Alas, such reactionary upsets are staging to happen with all Western democracies. It's a predictable reaction to governments that have become unconscionably corrupt & dysfunctional. The tragedy is, they unwittingly throw the baby out with the bath, and this opens the door to right-wing fascists, fanatics & bigots taking over, which is what's happening. Witness what happened in Germany in the 1930s. Indeed, those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Things do not portend well... Orwell's "1984" & Huxley's "Brave New World" is happening...

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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the comment, thank you for sharing your thoughts, and I'm glad you enjoyed my little piece of political satire.

You have a fascinating perspective. Orwell and Huxley's works are often invoked by conservatives against many of the left's policies and ideals, and fascism itself drew aspects of left-wing regulatory policy and social programs with more traditionally right-wing social conservatism. Both conservative and liberals tend to conflate their political opponents with the dystopian futures of these books and fascism in general.

Once the dust settles and tempers cool (which I must say is taking longer than usual), that's when we'll get a real picture of what the new reality will be under the next administration. There's too much schadenfreude among Trump supporters, too much shock and anger among Hillary supporters, and not enough dispassionate dialogue to get any clarity yet on what's to come. I think it's premature to say that anyone's future is now screwed, and the parallels between the modern-day USA and 1930's Germany just aren't there. The U.S. has suffered no humiliating military defeat, no crippling economic punishments, and no currency collapse.
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:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Professional Writer
:D :D  Hello!  Sorry for the late reply. Been busy. (I work for Macy's as a concierge & the Holi-Daze have begun)...

Well, my perspective comes from being a history teacher + broad experience & age... Curious but predictable that both conservatives & liberals use Orwell & Huxley to argue their thinking/beliefs. The authors were simply showing (as history as proven) the inevitable result of what happens when conditions like what's been happening cause/allow reactionary extremists & fanatics to rule...

While I don't think Trump will be able to do all he says/wants, or that America is going to become a neo-Nazi state, he & his supporters beliefs/policies/agendas are going to prove a disaster for both America & the world at large...

The U.S. has suffered continuing ongoing humiliating military defeats: Beginning with Korea, the Vietnam, and now with every Middle East military campaign we've been in since 9/11 proving a fiasco & tragic failure (which has put the government some $15-trillion in debt). We have had a crippling economic event that's ongoing (the 2008 "Big Recession" caused by corporate greed) which has resulted in egregious prices inflation + put millions out of work, on welfare or trying to survive on starvation wages. The currency collapse will happen when China, Saudi Arabia, et al decide to call in the $trillions in credit they've given us to maintain the status quo (which could happen soon since the status quo is no longer working; ironically, at home, this being a prime cause for Trump's election...

Anyway, hope all is good with you...
:iconbestbuddiesplz:
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Again, thanks for the interesting perspective. I certainly agree that there is a strong potential for disaster for a Trump presidency, especially if he actually follows up his most inflammatory campaign rhetoric with the actions such rhetoric, if meant literally, would imply. So far, he seems to be moderating on most of his strongest rhetoric, but it's too soon to tell if that trend will continue into his presidency.

I find it curious to characterize U.S. military history post-WWII as continuing military defeats; the outcome of the Cold War, the Gulf War, incursions into Granada, Panama, and interventions in Kosovo, to say nothing of the overall success of communist containment makes the story much more complicated than a continual humiliation.  Even the frustrating conflicts in the Middle East aren't a good comparison, as the sum total of the active military has been maintained at less than 0.5% of the population through those years, and casualty rates have been orders of magnitude lower than those associated with WWI. Comparing that with Germany, whose military was forcibly dismantled following a war in which 4% of its population died (and a higher proportion was wounded), I don't see that kind of profound national humiliation.

Nor do I think that the U.S. recession is comparable in its effects to the imposed economic depression on Germany during the 1920s and early 30s. The 2008 recession was driven by U.S. home loans, not outside nations trying to punish the U.S. The Weimar republic was beset by hyperinflation, while inflation in the U.S. has been flat through the 2008 recession and subsequent recovery. The Great Depression hit Germany much harder than the U.S., and the 2008 recession was nowhere near as severe.

The vast majority of the U.S. sovereign debt is owned by Americans. While a sudden bond dump could lead to significant instability, I think this potential tends to be somewhat exaggerated. The likelihood is also somewhat mitigated by the fact that such a dump would have strong inflationary pressure which would lower the value of those bonds.

In any case, though, thanks for the thoughtful reply.
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:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2016  Professional Writer

:D  Hello again!  And, again, sorry for the late replies. As I may have mentioned, I work for Macy’s & the “Holi-Daze” have begun; long & crazy work hours…

Well, for various legal & other reasons, Trump won’t be able to implement ALL of the inflammatory campaign rhetoric he’s been spewing, but given the people he’s surrounded himself with as “advisors” and his cabinet & judicial choices, he’s obviously hell bent to impose his & his reactionary cronies will & stated radical agendas, regardless. If successful (a very real possibility given the current state of things) it will be both a national & global disaster…

Okay, we “won” the Cold War, but not because we were the “good guys” & the USSR was the “bad guys,” rather because we could outspend them in an arms race & the Soviet economy was going bankrupt (+ Gorbachev’s pragmatic realism re the old Soviet system being no longer sustainable as such). But in the end, nothing meaningfully/fundamentally changed, it just morphed into the new “Cold War” we have now (that, ironically, is more dangerous). Let’s be honest, the Gulf War was predicated on lies and has proven a tragic ongoing disaster (politically & financially not to mention humanitarianly). And, really, Granada, Panama, et al, have proven bad jokes… True, what’s been happening re America in this regard is not like the “humiliation” that happened in Germany after WW I, and I wasn’t comparing it to that in that way…

Likewise, Germany indeed suffered far more than the U.S. during the buildup to & happening of the Great Depression (due to the unjust draconian “reprisals” imposed by England & France + America’s willful isolationism; which set the stage for the rise of Hitler’s Nazism & Mussolini’s Fascism (the happenings in Russia re Lenin-cum-Stalin are tangentially related but different).  The reason America didn’t collapse due to this was the major social program reforms instituted & new banking/financial rules imposed by President F.D.R., whom the Establishment accused of being a “communist” (granted WW II ironically helped by putting everyone to work). Although the Establishment won’t admit it, it was President Reagan’s abolishing these financial rules (and social programs) to implement his “trickle down” (i.e., “Greed is good”) economic theory that made for the great disparity in the average American’s income vs. cost of living + allowed the bad loans & financial shenanigans that precipitated the 2008 “Great Recession” (not to mention the cost of the fiasco wars President Bush instigated). Note: I’m not defending the modern Democratic Party here, most of its members bought into this b.s., too…

The “Debt Thing” is an ironic can of worms. If China & the Saudi’s called in our debt/credit, they would ruin their own markets. The global economic system is interlocked in ways most people don’t understand…

Well, enough said for now. Let me send this before any more delays. I hope this finds you in good health & spirits. Please reply as you wish. I enjoy intelligent conversation…

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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's clear to me that what the president-elect says and what he does are often different. My interpretation of his inflammatory rhetoric is that Donald Trump sees himself as a deal-maker and business negotiator. From that paradigm, much of his inflammatory rhetoric can be interpreted as establishing initial bargaining positions which he doesn't necessarily expect to achieve, like a guy who starts negotiating price from an absurdly low or high position. Of course, that doesn't excuse the inflammatory, rude, and outright false statements that tend to attract so much attention, but it does make me wonder if there's a deeper strategy to his bombast. I guess we'll see.

The way you characterize the Cold War is interesting. I don't see the Soviets as "the bad guys" in an individual sense, but I do see the ideals of communism and socialism as being inherently corrupt and evil. I see the sad state of the Soviet economy as a natural outcome of the fundamental immorality of its ideals. To say that nothing changed with the fall of the Soviet Union is an extraordinary statement, considering the many millions who no longer live behind the Iron Curtain, and the "new Cold War" is far and away less dangerous than the original. The likelihood of another standoff like the Cuban Missile Crisis is remote, and the respective nuclear stockpiles have been reduced enough that they can no longer threaten a human extinction event like they did back in the 1960's (I can run the math/physics on that if you're curious).

Regarding the Gulf War, I was referring to the 1991 conflict, not the 2003-2011 nation-building exercise or its aftermath. That's not really a can of worms I care to open, and it'll be a while before the dust settles from it. In any case, the fact remains that the U.S. military remains the most capable in the world in terms of projecting power, and isn't at all comparable to the Weimar Republic's anemic and Treaty of Paris-limited defense force.

The benefits of FDR's regulations and Reagan's deregulation are another can of worms I don't care to open. FDR's social programs, however, are another matter. While the "safety net" aspect of them and their successors from LBJ's "Great Society" to the Clinton-era welfare reforms are useful for people without a family to fall back on, it was FDR's stimulus spending that brought the country out of the depression, especially as WWII got going. While I don't dispute the utility of social safety net programs as a last resort for the desperate, I don't see such programs as useful mechanisms for or contributors to economic prosperity. In fact, I see them as something of a threat when applied too widely. The 2008 crisis came about because of long-term unanimous support for Fannie and Freddie, as well as both borrowers and lenders getting into deals they had no business making. Likewise, federally-funded student loans have driven higher costs of college and saddled a generation with unprecedented levels of debt. In short, I see entitlement programs as more of a cause of economic problems than a solution.

Of course, Donald Trump has publicly stated that he has no interest in entitlement reform, so my perspective is likely to continue to be on the losing side of the political debate for at least 8 years, and probably longer than that.

To be honest, I don't have an opinion on the income/wealth disparity gap. What interests me is equality of opportunity, not equality of outcome, but I've heard concerns about this issue over the last few years from people I wouldn't expect. I haven't looked at it closely, and I'm beginning to think that I should. What do you think? Why is the disparity a problem, and how big of a problem do you think it is?

Anyway, thanks for replying! Your perspectives are fascinating.
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:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2016  Professional Writer

:D :D  Hello!

Again, sorry for the late reply. As mentioned, I work for Macy’s & the “Holi-Daze” shopping season has begun, so crazy work schedules ‘till after Xmas …

Anyway, yes, Trump may not be a “professional politician” but he’s adept at telling the mob what they want to hear to get their votes (whether or not he’ll “deliver” on all his demagogic rhetoric largely depends on how much he & his key supporters can get away with). And, yes, there is an “ulterior motivation”— Power. And a lot of the people using him to get it are dangerous… 
 

I never saw individual Russians as “bad guys,” either (nor any ordinary person from any country, for that matter). The Soviet system was never “communism” or “socialism,” rather a plutocratic oligarchical form of tyrannical fascism (radical political-economic theory as religion to support the cabal of gangsters that overthrew the previous bunch, in the name of the people of course). For that matter, America is not a “democracy,” rather a plutocratic oligarchical form of a republic (people are “freer” to do what they want & they get to vote, but they don’t get to choose who they can vote for nor, ultimately, decide who wins)…

Like it or not, as Machiavelli aptly noted (as have all other philosophers who have analyzed Mankind’s political-religious-economic control systems), if they are not fundamentally “immoral” they become so due to human nature. To oversimplify, all governments operate by the “Real World ‘Golden Rule’ ” (those with the gold rule). The “good/bad” and/or “right/wrong” of the outcomes of this depends on the “Virtù” (character; moral/ethical strength) of those running the show to be able to manage the innate corruption so that it benefits as many people as possible…

This reality is what I was getting at when I commented “nothing changed with the fall of the Soviet Union.” The old U.S.S.R. is gone, but largely has been reincarnated under Putin. And with 9/11 & Bush’s “Patriot Act” (America’s version of the “Reichstag ‘Enabling’ Act”) the U.S. the Founding Fathers envisioned is effectively gone, too (with the alleged “New World Order” it promised proving a series of tragic fiascos). And the hopeful new EU following the end of the “Iron Curtain” is fracturing into dissolution now, too (due to reasons I trust don’t need reiterating here). Needless to say, none of this is good news; it certainly doesn’t make us “safer.”…

I grew up in a military family and was getting my M.A. in history during the “Cuban Missile Crisis,” so I experienced the “Cold War” meaningfully. Yes, things were tense then; paranoia over a globally destructive nuclear war between the U.S. & Soviet Russia was overt (some of it roused deliberately by the propaganda from both sides). The difference then was there were only two major players, neither of which had any serious much less fanatical intention of blowing themselves up to destroy the other. Sanity always prevailed (as evinced by the “Cuban Missile Crisis” outcome). It was a dangerously perverse but controllable “game,” if you will, to maintain & increase dominance. The American strategy (since Soviet communism was a failure at generating wealth/making money vs. capitalism) was to “spend them into bankruptcy,” as J. F. Dulles put it, by engaging them in a costly arms race, etc. It worked…

Now we have a bunch of crazies (ISIS, etc., which our Middle East machinations & wars largely fostered) trying to destroy everything in the name of God (who can only be stopped by killing them before they get their hands on “weapons of mass destruction,” and our response to this has been largely a failure so far, due to the insidious control/power “games” we, the Russians, et al are now playing, exasperated by the “war” rhetoric between the U.S./West & Russia/East being at its highest since the “Cold War”). Plus, we now have climate change, pollution, over population, depletion of resources, impending economic crises, etc., ready to wreck civilization and our responses to dealing with these threats so far have mostly been lip service (due to the unconscionable greed & lust for power by those who really run the show). Sorry, I don’t see how we are “safer/better” today…
 
   

Alas, the 1991 Gulf War ended up a fiasco (and precipitated all the Middle East mess since) because we didn’t let our most capable military in the world do what it should have done (like we did in WW II). Schwarzkopf (we haven’t had as good or as honest a general since him) was charging on Baghdad with the intention of “going on and putting an end to all this now before it gets out of control,” and G.H.W. Bush told him to stop (for “political and economic reasons”). Appalled by the folly of this thinking, to his honor he obeyed orders then rightly resigned. His idiot son’s Gulf War (predicated on a lie for “political and economic reasons” & rationalized with self-righteous idealistic propaganda) guaranteed the appalling folly of this thinking would result…

Yes, F.D.R.’s “socialist” welfare & work programs were exactly what was needed at the time & they worked for the most part (and the later dismantling of some of them only reconstituted the problems they were intended to eliminate or at least manage). But as with virtually all government funded/run programs/projects (not to say this doesn’t happen with private operations, too) the intrinsic problem with welfare systems is that they invariably become “institutionalized.” Perversely ironic, they need to keep having people on welfare to justify & maintain their existence. Moreover, this means there is no realistic “mandatory requirements for aid” factor to getting as many physically/mentally able disadvantaged, poor & homeless people as possible into acceptable independent working & living situations. I live in San Francisco, which currently has the highest percentage in the country of homeless people vs. resident population (estimates are as high as 10-thousand). The City, God bless it, is “liberal” to a fault (and I don’t mean the San Andreas). With the best of intentions to be nice & kind, they began instituting all kinds of programs & services to help such people “get back on their feet.” Well, “if you build it, they will come,” and they did. The problem is, these programs & services are only stop-gap measures, there is virtually nothing to ensure getting them “back on their feet” (few jobs available they’re capable of doing, slave wages with no benefits, astronomical rents, etc.) and so the temporary housing & care becomes a revolving door. To make matters worse, half of these people have genuine disabilities and/or are certifiably “crazy,” to use the colloquial, and while proper care for the disabled is woefully wanting, the mental hospitals are now virtually nonexistent (thanks to Reagan). So, they’re constantly on the streets causing social, health & safety problems, not to mention being a blight to business, and they can’t be arrested unless they commit a serious crime. The other side of this coin is that a significant number of these homeless who are capable of working & getting “back on their feet” with program assistance, don’t seriously want to change their situation, regardless, and it’s illegal to force or require them to as a condition for welfare help. The City claims they’re spending over $200-million a year (!) to deal with this problem & it keeps getting worse. Where is all this money going? For that kind of money, I could put all of them up in a nice hotel & send them to college for four years. This is what’s crazy. It’s not the intention of “socialist” programs that’s wrong, it’s the System, the mentality of the bureaucrats running it. And, as Einstein aptly said: “No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it.” We need a new paradigm, to say the least, and not just to deal with this problem…

Re the “disparity problem,” as you call it: To oversimplify again for expediency, aside from the complicated major impacting factors (overpopulation/resource depletion, the “Tech Revolution” changing/destroying jobs, lack of affordable education/training, stagnate wages/buying power vs. dramatic cost of living increases, etc.) the direct cause is Greed coupled with the fact that “politics have no relation to morals” (Machiavelli). As Lord Acton famously said: “And remember, where you have a concentration of power/money in a few hands, all too frequently men with the mentality of gangsters get control. History has proven that. All power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Is this a big problem? You bet. It’s caused the dissolution & collapse of every civilization in history, and we’ll be no exception. Then the cycle starts over again. Needless to say, it’s best to be living during the apex of a cycle. There’s more than one good reason the bottom is called a “Dark Age.”…

Alright. Let me send this. I hope it finds you well. I’d enjoy continuing our conversations, if you wish. Whatever, my best wishes always…

:heart:

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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
As always, thanks for the discussion. You seem to be issuing a number of summary judgments that don't seem entirely justified.
-First, Americans can and do choose who they vote for; the primary process is built that way. Granted, you might not always like the choices presented on a ballot, but even in a general election, you can write in any name you like (or run yourself). Likewise, voters do decide the election. The electoral college process is clunky and weird, but it is ultimately driven by voters.
-You again seem quick to draw parallels between the acts of conservative leaders and Nazi Germany that aren't justified. The Reichstag Enabling Act of 1933 gave Hitler total dictatorial power to enact laws without the legislature. That's got nothing to do with the Patriot Act.
-Your characterization of the Gulf War and its aftermath seems to focus exclusively on the negative outcomes and the present-day conflict with ISIS. The outcomes of that conflict were complicated, and the long-term prognosis for Iraq isn't settled yet.
-While cooler heads prevailed in the Cuban Missile Crisis, it was a far nearer thing than you're describing. In fact, were it not for a lone political officer on a Soviet nuclear sub refusing to launch a nuke despite the captain and first officer pressuring him to do so, we might not be having this conversation at all. On a related note:
-The explosive yields of the arsenals in the 1960's were about 30 times what they are today. The effects of a nuclear exchange today vs a nuclear exchange then would be far smaller in both absolute and relative lives lost. The other risk factors you mention don't compare to that kind of devastation. I'm not saying that they're unimportant for us today, I'm just saying that they don't compare to that kind of threat.
-Your characterizations of both Presidents Bush smatter of ad hominem attacks and straw men. I'm not saying either George was the second coming, but your word choice makes me worry that discussing either man in anything but a bandwagoning, very negative light will upset you and take this conversation down an unpleasant tangent.

Facts and interpretations aside, I feel like we're dancing around a central issue. I'd like to shift gears a bit and talk philosophy. There's a question I've been trying to wrap my head around, and it has to do with almost everything you mention in the latter half of your reply:

How should we balance the principle of equal opportunity against the desire for equal outcomes?  This, to me, is one of the most important questions in politics, driving policies on taxation, entitlements, social programs, education, financial regulation, and innumerable smaller issues.
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(1 Reply)
:iconfungizu:
Fungizu Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2016
FU to fuck
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'd have to do that by county, not by state.
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:iconcupcaketaker18:
CupcakeTaker18 Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2016
It's quite sad. The 2 US States that I have lived in both supported Trump. Well if they supported Hillary it would be the same, just not Trump would be good, I'm scared for the future of the US hopefully the media just overdramatized the whole thing, I'm not religious but I'm praying for my and many others home.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think the media can be counted upon to over-dramatize matters, especially elections. I'm an optimist. The constitution was written with checks and balances to limit the damage any one person can do, and it has survived far worse things than the election of Donald Trump.
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:iconcupcaketaker18:
CupcakeTaker18 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
I agree, but the pessimist in me says it's all gonna go to shit. I personally thought both of the candidates were terrible, and my dad said voting for a lesser evil is still voting for evil, I just hope it'll be good :/
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm inclined to agree with your assessment of both candidates, though I think the fault is our own. That's the thing with democracy; the people are ultimately responsible for themselves and their government. I think we'd be better served by some introspection, reflection, and calm dialogue after the bombast of the last year, and I hope that everyone involved can do so, though I'm not holding my breath on that.
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:iconcupcaketaker18:
CupcakeTaker18 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016
Yeah. Now that I think about it the US rarely talks about their problems, but that could just be my misunderstanding of US history. I wish that we could just talk about it, I don't like Obama but everything was calm during his run. I wish we could re-elect him.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There I disagree with you, not because of my opinion of Barack Obama, but because I think that executive political power should have an expiration date, and it's important for the chief executive to step away from his or her role as a matter of course. Washington's example of doing so voluntarily was one of his great legacies, and one that should be perpetuated. FDR's decision to break that tradition could well have led to the rise of perpetual executive leaders, something that the United States has been against from its inception. The subsequent constitutional amendment forcing presidents to follow Washington's example was appropriate.

The reality is that we can indeed just talk about political issues; we just tend to suck at such discussions because most people conflate any political discussion with political debate. Worse, most of the debates we see on TV are garbage time-filler with talking heads trying to talk over each other by loudly spouting pre-planned talking points built on logical fallacies.

We're overdue for another Age of Reason.
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:iconpearlbomber:
Pearlbomber Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
I took me far longer to get this than I care to admit... But, now that I get it, I love it! Very Clever Idea!:D (Big Grin) 
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you! From a technical point of view, it's the quickest and crudest work I've ever posted, but it was a fun little 5-minute piece to make.
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:iconpearlbomber:
Pearlbomber Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
Sometimes the quickest made art comes from the "heart" and is more personable to people. As you don't have too much time to overthink everything. (Most people don't think things through... Like in regular conversation...or electing a president!Wink/Razz )
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:iconnanoshi:
Nanoshi Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016
There is this film called 'Idiocracy' and basically it just happened...
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, that film has been a self-fulfilling prophecy since it first came out. It's one of my favorite all-time movies.
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:iconnocturnaliss:
Nocturnaliss Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016   Writer
As a European... Yeah, that's kind of the feeling I get. Like 'everyone' in the US gave up on reason and the very name of the country (United States), and decided it'd be great to play russian roulette with the entire world by electing a man who only wanted to win the election - no one stops to wonder, hey, is he actually fit to govern a country that big? I can tell you one thing: my LGBT US friends are worried about their future. And I'm worried for them.

That said, I think it's mostly a big slap in the face to the countless Americans who didn't vote Trump, don't support him, don't respect him, and simply don't want him as their president. I can't even call that joker a 'president'. It's insulting to those who came before him.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Trump's supporters see him and his campaign from a different paradigm, and the fact that most of the voting public in this election stated that they have no confidence in their news organizations to report the truth is telling. The decline of objective, fact-based journalism in the U.S. tends to skew perspectives both inside and outside the country. Most of the U.S. "main-stream media" that participates in international news markets tends to be sympathetic to the left and unsympathetic to the right, and that tends to shape a great deal of international opinion. However, domestically-focused media tends to be the opposite. If the U.S.'s radio shows, which tend to skew strongly to the right in their sympathies, became a thing in Europe, then I think the perspectives and reaction to this election would be more mixed.

I think that most of Trump's supporters would consider their vote a slap in the face to many of the left's positions and practices, but I personally wouldn't read into it that much. Fundamentally, Trump won because Hillary was depending on the same people who turned out in droves Barack Obama, but she lacked Barack Obama's charisma and vision. As for insulting those who came before, I guess we'll see; it depends on what The Donald does from here on. The U.S. has had some bad, or at least highly-controversial presidents in the past: Warren G. Harding, Andrew Jackson, Richard Nixon, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, to name a few.
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:iconnocturnaliss:
Nocturnaliss Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016   Writer
I think what worries me the most is that Trump seems impulsive. Impulsive people in places of power doesn't seem to me like a good mix.

Like you say though, I guess we'll see. Hopefully, we'll se positivity. 
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have yet to meet a person who doesn't say things impulsively from time to time. The genius of Trump is that he does so frequently, such that his hyperbole is taken far less seriously. He did a better job controlling his impulsiveness as his campaign finished, and thus far, it seems that he is not following through with his campaign hyperbole in a literal sense. The mystery to me is whether his impulsive style of speech, particularly early in the campaign, will extend into an impulsive style of executive decision-making in matters that did not arise during the campaign.
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:iconnocturnaliss:
Nocturnaliss Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016   Writer
In the meantime, you've got a country divided by racism and hate, which he brought about with his impulsive speeches. I wonder how he's going to fix that one.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
He's certainly said some racist things during the campaign, and I abhor the identity politics that both he and Hillary embraced. The idea that we should define our values and loyalties by the color of our skin or the composition or preferred use of our sex organs is, to me, deplorable. I'm not looking to Donald Trump to heal our nation's racial divisions, because I don't think it's up to Donald Trump to fix racial divisions. I think that's up to us.
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:iconnocturnaliss:
Nocturnaliss Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2016   Writer
Well said. I hope many people think like you :) 
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's quite flattering, thank you. That said, I'm less troubled by what people think as I am about how people think. Political rhetoric is rampant with logical fallacies, and it bothers me how well those fallacies play with people of virtually every political persuasion.
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(1 Reply)
:iconbelrhaza4017:
BelRhaza4017 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Yikes..... that is both sobering and sucks to think about
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Given the bounce-back among international markets since election night, the shock is wearing off and people seem to be taking a "wait and see" approach. Ultimately, I'm sure the rest of the world will care more about Donald Trump's actions as president than the fact that we elected him in the first place.
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:iconbelrhaza4017:
BelRhaza4017 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
True enough
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:icongenisay:
Genisay Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, I had a feeling that if Trump won, the rest of the world would see it this way.  This was not the kind of message I would have wanted my country to send. T.T
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm sure that, for most of his supporters, it's not the message they intended, or at least not a message they intended for the rest of the world.
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:icongenisay:
Genisay Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I certainly hope that us the case. But I can say that my hopefulness that the US was moving forward in it's thinking gas been shaken, and even with realizing that there are plenty of people here who are still close minded, I may have still been naive in my thinking. It seems the number of people who are open and willing to embrace other people's and cultures are still vastly the minority.
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I try not to assume that anyone is closed-minded until they've individually demonstrated that (and I don't regard a vote for any candidate to constitute such a demonstration). WHen I think that someone else is closed-minded, it tends to be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Of course, sometimes people really are that way, but I like to take people one at a time. Experience has shown me that no political movement is free of closed-mindedness; that doesn't invalidate everyone associated with that movement for me. I know and like people on both sides of this election (as well as minor party supporters), and I enjoy discussing their beliefs with almost all of them.
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:iconbrojoe2015:
BroJoe2015 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016  Student General Artist
If trump does something extremely stupid (I have a really bad feeling that trump is going to do something stupid to offend our allies (which is going hurt our economy and the countries he offends (it will be more than one, that's for sure)), I'm getting my girlfriend and going to South Korea to live her and family. If SK doesn't get their problems fixed with their PM scandal, then we're going to France (because my gf knows a little French, even though she's Korean).
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm an optimist, myself. The checks and balances of the constitution have kept the USA going through all kinds of presidential blunders in the past. I wouldn't look into moving out of fear. That said, I've lived abroad twice in my life, and I treasure those experiences. I think that spending time in other countries contributed to my personal growth and broadened my outlook on a wide variety of subjects.
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:iconar1nee:
ar1nee Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2016
It took me a moment to see it, but now that I do, thank you. It's perfect.

Hugs and strength to you 
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:iconwill-erwin:
Will-Erwin Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hey, thanks! Right back at you.
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